Kuwarddewardde: the stone country | David Hancock

StoneCountryFront.jpg
 Warddeken Indigenous Protected Area covers 1,394,951 hectares of spectacular stone and gorge country on the western Arnhem Land plateau, in northern Australia. The area adjoins Kakadu NP Warddeken ranger Emmanuel qt rock art site
 The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Victor  Garlngarr and wife Barbara Gurwalwal at a rock art site at Victor's home country at Ngalkombarli, in Arnhem Land.
 The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather water tuber - ankodjbang - in a creek running off the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pamkal (dark frizzy hair red top), Merrill Namundja (Seraine's mum) and Jenny Nadjamerrek (blue dress).
 Bats take flight from a spring at Nakarriken (shots of creek flats and spring water and paperbarks). Warddeken IPA Arnhem Land plateau indigenous land management Aboriginal culture indigenous rock art images
 Warddeken IPA - indigenous landowners walk across their country to reaquaint themselves with names and places. Landscape and aerials of the Arnhem Land plateau and stone country
 Kakadu National Park in the Top End of northern Australia is one of the world's Heritage areas and a popular destination for tourists from all over the world. Arnhem Land escarpment in the wet season - Jim Jim Falls
 Kakadu National Park in the Top End of the Northern Territory - World Heritage area which is popular with tourists and one of the great environmental parks of Australia. During the wet season creeks and rivers flood and areas become isolated -  Nourlangie Rock.  Pandanus basedowi
 The Top End of Australia during the wet season flying in a helicopter, from the floodplains around the Adelaide River to Arnhem Land near the East Aligator River. Arnhem Land escarpment and stone country
 The Top End of Australia during the wet season flying in a helicopter, from the floodplains around the Adelaide River to Arnhem Land near the East Aligator River.  Escarpment and sandstone country along the East Aligator River in the wet season.
 Significant rock art sites from the contact period (between Europens and Aboriginal people) in western Arnhem Land in the Warddeken IPA - stone country Arnhem Land plateau - gun gallery and rainbow serpent
 Warddeken IPA - Arnhem Land - survey of rock art from the Contact Period - cavern area known as Djurri kawok bebmeng - with rickets blue
 Warddeken IPA - Arnhem Land - survey of rock art from the Contact Period - landscapes from air - Liverpool River near Havelock Falls - Ray Nadjamerrek with his wife Eliza Nawirridj and son Richard - Ray is the son of a traditional owner, and a Warddeken ranger
StoneCountryFront.jpg
 Warddeken Indigenous Protected Area covers 1,394,951 hectares of spectacular stone and gorge country on the western Arnhem Land plateau, in northern Australia. The area adjoins Kakadu NP Warddeken ranger Emmanuel qt rock art site
 The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Victor  Garlngarr and wife Barbara Gurwalwal at a rock art site at Victor's home country at Ngalkombarli, in Arnhem Land.
 The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather water tuber - ankodjbang - in a creek running off the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pamkal (dark frizzy hair red top), Merrill Namundja (Seraine's mum) and Jenny Nadjamerrek (blue dress).
 Bats take flight from a spring at Nakarriken (shots of creek flats and spring water and paperbarks). Warddeken IPA Arnhem Land plateau indigenous land management Aboriginal culture indigenous rock art images
 Warddeken IPA - indigenous landowners walk across their country to reaquaint themselves with names and places. Landscape and aerials of the Arnhem Land plateau and stone country
 Kakadu National Park in the Top End of northern Australia is one of the world's Heritage areas and a popular destination for tourists from all over the world. Arnhem Land escarpment in the wet season - Jim Jim Falls
 Kakadu National Park in the Top End of the Northern Territory - World Heritage area which is popular with tourists and one of the great environmental parks of Australia. During the wet season creeks and rivers flood and areas become isolated -  Nourlangie Rock.  Pandanus basedowi
 The Top End of Australia during the wet season flying in a helicopter, from the floodplains around the Adelaide River to Arnhem Land near the East Aligator River. Arnhem Land escarpment and stone country
 The Top End of Australia during the wet season flying in a helicopter, from the floodplains around the Adelaide River to Arnhem Land near the East Aligator River.  Escarpment and sandstone country along the East Aligator River in the wet season.
 Significant rock art sites from the contact period (between Europens and Aboriginal people) in western Arnhem Land in the Warddeken IPA - stone country Arnhem Land plateau - gun gallery and rainbow serpent
 Warddeken IPA - Arnhem Land - survey of rock art from the Contact Period - cavern area known as Djurri kawok bebmeng - with rickets blue
 Warddeken IPA - Arnhem Land - survey of rock art from the Contact Period - landscapes from air - Liverpool River near Havelock Falls - Ray Nadjamerrek with his wife Eliza Nawirridj and son Richard - Ray is the son of a traditional owner, and a Warddeken ranger

Kuwarddewardde: the stone country | David Hancock

60.00

A new book by North Australian photographer and writer David Hancock is focused on the Arnhem Land plateau, one of the most forbidding, mysterious and ancient areas of the world.

 The plateau (also known as the Stone Country) covers an area of 22,000 sq kms and generates much of the fertility of the Top End of Australia. The region is stunningly beautiful and unique, both physically and culturally.

 The traditional home to more than 50 clans of the Bininj Aboriginal people of western Arnhem Land - who know it as Kuwarddewardde – the region has long been refuge for them, and rare fauna and flora.

 People have lived in Kuwarddewardde for tens of thousands of years  - their presence attested to on the walls and ceilings of rock shelters, from images of small dynamic figures that date back over 50,000 years, to “contact” art that depicts the arrival of Europeans in northern Australia less than 200 years ago.

 The rock art of the plateau is extensive, representing the longest continual record of human settlement and endeavor of any place on Earth.

 To European newcomers, the Stone Country was an unwelcoming, hot environment with rugged cliffs, bare, layered sandstone and difficult-to-navigate terrain. For Bininj, who crisscrossed the plateau for millenia, food and shelter was plentiful and routes between the coast and inland regions were easy to travel.

 David Hancock works closely with Bininj people and has taken ten years to photograph and write this book that gives an insight to a remote and rugged environment populated by dynamic and resourceful people.


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